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Local authorities to use latest technology for waste collection
Local authorities to use latest technology for waste collection

Local authorities to use latest technology for waste collection

Local authorities are looking at the latest technology for their waste management fleets after government legislation directs their thinking for the future.

Last year, the government announced that new petrol and diesel vehicles will be banned in the UK from 2040.

It’s a bid to tackle air pollution and is part of a £3 billion clean air strategy of the government.

Local authorities will therefore have to change the way their fleets are run; waste management is a fundamental service for residents in every town and city in the UK.

It also means that waste management fleets are in urban areas each and every day, removing all manner of waste from Britain’s households.

Because of this, the pollution caused by these vehicles will reduce the air quality throughout the UK, and this is something that the government wants to reduce in the long term.

It is all the more important for local authorities, given it is estimated that 60% of people in the country will live in urban areas by 2030, and according to the World Health Organisation, 40,000 deaths are associated with “toxic air” every year.

Recent estimations show that councils in the UK spend approximately £850 million each year on waste collections. It therefore highlights how even the slightest savings can make all the difference.

Refuse Collection Vehicles (RCVs) are commonly in urban areas. As a result, local authorities are now looking at purchasing fleets that are run by technology that are all-electric, or hybrids.

Some city councils have already got in on the act but now, hybrid vehicles are are being sought after by local authorities.

Suited to urban rounds, these vehicles can be run by lithium-ion battery packs which take up less weight and without diesel and petrol engines, means these waste management fleets are much more productive.

Significantly, local authorities can also find vehicles in this field that do not emit carbon dioxide and, with many used on urban routes, this is an important breakthrough, and one that councils will seek to make the most of in the future.

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